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Five Things to Keep in Mind about Planned Giving During a Capital Campaign

by: Allison Sanka on

So many times during a capital campaign, planned giving marketing stalls or takes a backseat to the marketing for the campaign. The two should not affect or depend on each other. In fact, they should run in tandem. The main reason is that your capital campaign supporter and your planned giving donor usually aren’t the same segment of your donor file. The same way you wouldn’t stop your annual appeal during a capital campaign, you shouldn’t derail your planned giving marketing efforts either.

Here are five things to keep in mind about your planned giving marketing during a capital campaign:

  1. Planned gifts are the major gift of the rank-and-file donor. For donors who aren’t cash-rich enough to make a capital campaign or major gift, the capital campaign may be just the opportunity your more moderate-but-loyal donors are looking for. And because your PG donors usually aren’t the same as your capital campaign supporters, there should be little fear that planned gifts identified during a capital campaign will cannibalize the capital campaign’s goals.
  2. Planned giving happens on the donor’s time-frame, not the organization’s. Just because the organization’s big focus is the capital campaign, don’t lose sight that planned giving happens all the time, even during a capital campaign. The two may coincide unintentionally—and that can work to your benefit.
  3. Consistency and frequency is the key to success for any marketing campaign. Ensuring your message is in front of potential donors when they decide to make the gift is critical. Because you don’t know when that is, going silent for months could mean losing out on this opportunity. If you stop, then restart, you slow the momentum and efficacy of the campaign, and like will end up a few steps back from where you were. A consistent and frequent marketing campaign is always the best practice.
  4. Stopping planned giving marketing sends the wrong message to your donors. In addition to losing momentum, a lack of planned giving marketing messaging could imply that the program is not important to the organization.
  5. Capital Campaigns mean increased marketing budgets. It’s a great opportunity to tag along on bigger marketing initiatives, at little to no additional cost! Work with your development colleagues to ensure there is a planned giving option and messaging in all capital campaign media and public relations.

While planned gifts don’t technically count towards a capital campaign’s bottom line goal, fostering participation from a segment of your donor file who wouldn’t be able to participate in the capital campaign encourages those who want to make a planned gift to come forward during this time. They can feel part of the campaign to “give big” in a way they can, even if the dollars are deferred.

Including planned giving as part of the capital campaign marketing encourages philanthropy, which ultimately is the goal of all fundraising marketing. Including planned giving messaging during your capital campaign is a great way to drive awareness of your PG program, build your PG pipeline, and show the value of planned giving to the bottom line. It’s a win-win-win!

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